Playa La Saladita

Follow the surfing fanatics to Playa la Saladita, a stunning, secluded beach north of Zihuatanejo

For a dose of crystalline coastal serenity or a shot a catching a slow, rolling wave, it's tough to trump this secluded beach about a half-hour from Zihuatanejo.



A warning: getting to Saladita may take some effort. But trust me—it's worth it. Once you're toeing your surfboard or the threads of palapa-shaded hammock, you too will understand.



Take highway 200 north towards Lázaro Cárdenas until you reach a small town called Los Llanos. Turn left into town and follow the paved road to the right, past the basketball court. Playa la Saladita is about 5 kms from the highway.

Killer Waves

Saladita is good for both newbie surfers and seasoned long boarders, or even just to hang out and watch people catch waves. Locals are mellow, the surf is consistent and businesses operate very casually.

You can rent boards at a few spots, and lessons are available. Directly in front of the point break, Lourdes Bar and Grill has a range of boards for US$25 per day, as well as food, entertainment and simple beachfront cabins for rent.

Saladita Eats

For all its seclusion, Saladita is fairly well appointed. A half-dozen restaurants are spread along the coastline.

Each offers regional food—quesadillas, ceviche, shrimp and seafood dishes, sandwiches—and drink for a good price. How good? Meals start at 40 pesos.

Where to Stay

Finding such a beautiful beach gem will have you longing to stay longer than a day. Lucky for you, sleeping arrangements are plentiful, and run the gamut:

Plush: an idyllic, 12-person beach house called Casa Creando Olas

Comfortable: basic apartments with decent amenities, such as Casa Esmerelda and Villas Jacqueline

Rustic: simple cabanas with raised verandahs, like those at Saladita Resort Camp, or House of Waves

There's also ample camping, wherein 30 to 50 pesos gets you a palapa-covered patch of sand, literally just a few steps from the ocean.

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